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[13][3][needs update] As of October 2017, she describes in interview as having "lost a child to an unfair system", and to be in care of fourteen children. [5], Eventually, this led the creation of a sponsorship program that paired children with American and other donors who would donate the $300 needed annually to cover the child's school, medical, and food costs. [citation needed] While there she did mission work in the city of Jinja on the shores of Lake Victoria,[5] which had a population of approximately 75,000 at the time. Additionally, Amazima Ministries provides job opportunities so families can have sustainable income. Katie Davis Majors and her husband, Benji, are the parents of 13 adopted daughters and two sons. [verification needed][citation needed][6] She states in her writing that she fell in love with the Ugandan people and their culture, and decided to go back to Uganda in the summer of 2007 (after graduating from high school). As of 2009–2010, Davis and Amazima had initiated the Masese Feeding Program serving 1200, as well as the Masese Beading Circle,[1][third-party source needed] for this Jinja District community in a fishing region on Lake Victoria. [1][third-party source needed] In addition to managing sponsorships and vocational opportunities, and distributing food and health care,[13][12] Amazima established a farming outreach program,[12] and a specific program to sell the paper and glass bead jewelry manufactured by Ugandans in its Masese Beading Circle to customers in the United States and elsewhere. Their daughters were even Davis’ bridesmaids. [5] As described by Bob Smietana for USA Today, Davis... noticed many of her students were dropping out because either their parents had died or they could no longer afford school fees. [12], As of July 2011, Davis was employed as the director of Amazima, employment that she uses to support herself and those in her care. She married in 2015, and she and her husband live in Jinja, in care of 15 Ugandan children. Some parents were dropping off their children at orphanages because they could not provide basics like food and shelter. [citation needed] She is the family's oldest child, and has a younger brother named Bradley. The youngest was actually given to Davis by an HIV-positive mother of 12. [citation needed] Her mother, Mary Pat Davis,[3] and her father, Scott Davis, raised her in Nashville. Katie Davis Majors and her husband, Benji, are the parents of 13 adopted daughters and two sons. Davis rented a house to make room for her three new daughters and over the course of the next 18 months, 10 more girls moved in, all of whom had been abandoned, abused or had parents who died of AIDS. Davis couldn’t find any living relatives willing to take the girls and couldn’t imagine sending them to the orphanage, so she took them in. You could earn up to $8,000 in scholarships throughout your college career by joining Texas Right to Life’s Dr. Joseph Graham Fellowship program and helping lead an on-campus pro-life group! [15], Davis documented her experiences, first in a blog that began the year of her arrival—entitled "Kisses from Katie",[citation needed]—and later, in bestselling books in 2011 and 2017, the first while in paperback, the second as a hardback. Amazima Ministries provides 400 children with education and over 1,600 families with food and health services with the support of American donors. Kisses from Katie: A Story of Relentless Love and Redemption, Daring to Hope: Finding God's Goodness in the Broken and the Beautiful. While Katie was a single mom at first, she eventually met Benji Majors, who was from her hometown; yet surprisingly, they had never met until he landed in Uganda for a mission trip. We are still rejoicing with the Majors family! While Katie was a single mom at first, she eventually met Benji Majors, who was from her hometown; yet surprisingly, they had never met until he landed in Uganda for a mission trip. In fact, the girls love Benji just as much as Katie does. Katie Davis Majors Became An Adoptive Mother To 13 Daughters At 23, Forced Abortion and Infanticide: The Genocide of the Uyghur Muslim Population, SCOTUS Upholds Reinstatement of Mexico City Policy. [4][16][17], As of July 2011, one local child welfare officer, Caroline Bankusha, had publicly expressed concern over the planned adoption, stating, "Unless the children are placed under a children's ministry or children's home, which she [could] start... it is really bad for someone to have more than five children". [3] Bankusha, while noting the legislated 25-year-old minimum parental age, and the stipulation that parents be "at least 21 years older than the child being adopted", acknowledged that it was within the purview of the deciding judge to allow adoption exceptions were they to deem it as being in the children's best interests. Majors described her experiences in a decade-long blog ("Kisses from Katie", through 2017), and in two memoirs that became New York Times bestsellers, Kisses from Katie: A Story of Relentless Love and Redemption (2011) and Daring to Hope: Finding God's Goodness in the Broken and the Beautiful (2017). Founding of AMI (2008), and Amazima Primary School (2020); This page was last edited on 30 September 2020, at 16:58. They fell in love and married in 2015. [3][12] As of October 2011, Amazima was being described as, an organization based in Jinja that sponsors Ugandan school children, provides vocational opportunities for poor Ugandans, and distributes food and health care services to the families of more than 1,600 children in Masese, a nearby slum. ", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Katie_Davis_(missionary)&oldid=981160538, Articles lacking reliable references from February 2020, Articles with unsourced statements from February 2020, Wikipedia articles needing factual verification from February 2020, Wikipedia articles in need of updating from February 2020, All Wikipedia articles in need of updating, Articles lacking in-text citations from February 2020, Articles with multiple maintenance issues, Pages using Infobox writer with unknown parameters, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Christian missions, child-/family-centric. Our founder, Katie Davis, got married last month and was gracious enough to share her heart with us in her most recent blog post. [3][needs update]. Unplanned, takes the viewer through Johnson’s conversion story and what led her into her ministry, ATTWN, which helps clinic workers leave the abortion industry. But knowing there [was] nowhere else for them to go, I [didn't] find myself capable of sending them away. Currently, there is no content with this tag. [citation needed] In Brentwood, Tennessee,[3] Davis was a homecoming queen of her high school, and a class president. Additionally, she is the author of Kisses from Katie: A Story of Relentless Love and Redemption which chronicles her amazing call and obedience to God and to Uganda, and Daring to Hope: Finding God's Goodness in the Broken and the Beautiful. Luckily, a judge could override the rule if it is in the "best interest" of the child(ren), a fact to which her children attested. [8][better source needed] In the fall of 2008, Davis fulfilled a promise to her parents and returned to the U.S. to enroll in nursing college, but the return was short lived; stating that "she quickly realized she missed the [children] too much," she left college and returned to Uganda. [2] The work led to founding of a school and to provision of other services in Jinja, which now operate under the auspices of the Tennessee-based not-for-profit, Amazima Ministries International (AMI), where "amazima" means "truth" in Lugandan. The adoption process wasn't easy. Katie Davis Majors (born November 1, 1989[not verified in body]) is an American missionary and author who established a mission in Jinja, Uganda in 2007. Within six years of returning to Uganda, Davis had taken 13 Ugandan orphans into her care,[5][3] The journey to that point began in January 2008, as Davis described it to NPR,[3] following the rainstorm collapse of a mud hut that housed three orphans. However, after experiencing the Ugandan culture, Davis decided she couldn't not do something to help. Today, Katie lives in Uganda with her husband and 14 children (who now range from 2 to 22) and together they run a non-profit organization she founded called Amazima Ministries (amazima means “truth” in the local language). In 2016, their family expanded even more as Katie and Benji welcomed their first biological child, a son named Noah. Ten years ago, when she was 18, Katie Davis decided to go on a three-week mission trip to Uganda before college. Davis was described by Bonnie Allen of NPR as "a devout Christian who idolizes Mother Teresa." [18] The Majors gave birth to a son, Noah, in 2016, and were still living in Jinja as of 2018.[2][15][18]. So Davis persuaded her parents and other friends to donate money for school, meals and medical care for the children. In 2008, she started [11][10] As of July 2011, Amazima was described as drawing on donors from the United States to feed more than a thousand children each weekday, while providing programs aimed at community health, and helping 400 to attend school. [13], As of October 2012, Amazima was staffed by a dozen Ugandans and operating on a $700,000 annual budget, providing daily meals to about 2,000 children and managing the sponsorship of about 500 students. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. She returned to the states, told her parents she was forgoing college and returned to Uganda to live as a missionary dedicated to providing education to the people. To find out more about Amazima Ministries visit their website. [citation needed]. They fell in love and married in 2015. Little did she know, she would soon meet 13 amazing girls who would change her life forever. [3] Within two years, a further ten girls who had lost parents to AIDS or had otherwise been abused or abandoned joined the first three. [better source needed], Katie Davis Majors was born Katie Davis on November 1, 1989 in Nashville, Tennessee. In fact, Ugandan law states a person must be 25 and at least 21 years older than the child to adopt. Before the mission trip she had won homecoming queen in her hometown of Brentwood, Tennessee and was planning to attend nursing school. Davis, at 19, was teaching kindergarten at Canaan Children's Home, an orphanage in Jinja. [3] Davis described her quandary, thus: My first instinct [was] not, 'Oh, a baby—let me adopt it!' [8][better source needed][14][third-party source needed][12] By March 2018, its program to provide meals was still serving 1200 individuals daily, and the student sponsorships had grown to include on the order of 800 children. In January 2008, a hut down the street from the orphanage collapsed during a storm on three AIDS orphans. The couple got married in 2015 and during that time she didn’t have her friends or sisters to be bridesmaids for her wedding in Uganda, so instead, she had her 13 beautiful daughters who continue to be living proof of God’s grace, faithfulness, and redemption. Photo: Katie Davis Majors You are … In 2008, she started Amazima Ministries International, a non-profit organization to meet the physical, emotional, educational, and spiritual needs of the people of Uganda. [7][third-party source needed] The name chosen, "Amazima", means "Truth" in the native Lugandan language in that area of Uganda.

Tony Thomas Zoho, Labarge Cove Canyon Lake, Contacts Icon Aesthetic, Scott Harris 594, Sharon Needles 2020, Ja Baij Shrine Chest Icon, Daniel Larusso Age, Mike Patterson Death, Portuguese Skin Tone, Gwen Sebastian Net Worth, Roblox Shirt Maker,

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