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Homemade Seitan Sausage

The first time I made my very own seitan meat I was over the moon, it was like a whole new door had opened full of possibilities! Before I tried I had deemed it to be too complicated to even giving it a go, but I quickly found that as long as you have the vital wheat gluten, making the actual fake meat is very simple.

This is my latest version of many attempts of trying to perfect seitan sausages, and one that I really love. I find that adding some tofu makes the texture less tough.

I use this recipe as a foundation, and then I often like to add herbs or other spices to flavour it in different ways. I sometimes make a batch on Sundays and then use the “meat” throughout the week in different variations, from salads to soups or just as they are – enjoy!

Homemade Seitan Sausage

Homemade Seitan Sausages
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Dry ingredients
  1. 2 cups vital wheat gluten
  2. 1/2 cup nutritional yeast
  3. 1/4 cup chickpea flour (or soy flour)
  4. 2 tbsp onion powder
  5. 1/2 tsp pepper
  6. 2 tsp paprika
  7. 1 tsp smoked paprika
  8. 1 tsp salt
  9. 1 tbsp ground mustard seeds
  10. 1 1/2 tsp sugar
Wet ingredients
  1. 1 cup water
  2. 3 garlic cloves
  3. 2 tbsp soy sauce
  4. 300g/10 oz tofu
Instructions
  1. Combine all the dry in gredients in a bowl. Mix all the wet ingredients with a blender to a smooth mixture, and then add it to the bowl with the dry ingredients and combine well.
  2. Knead the dough for a few minutes until the ingredients are sticking together. Divide the dough in 10 smaller pieces and roll them into sausages. Wrap each sausage up in tin foil and steam for 30 minutes, either in a steamer or in a sieve over a pot of boiling water (cover with a lid!). You can also bake the sausages in the oven for 1 hour at 175°/350F but the consistency will be slightly tougher.
  3. Serve with mashed potatoes or whatever you fancy!
Sofia von Porat https://sofiavonporat.com/

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11 Comments

  • Reply
    Orly
    April 27 at 2:16 pm

    Can these be fried after stemming?

    • Reply
      Sofia
      April 27 at 4:27 pm

      Hi Orly! Yes they can be fried after steaming 🙂

  • Reply
    Lisa
    April 27 at 5:04 pm

    Thanks Sofia for all the fabulous recipes. Love getting them in my inbox

  • Reply
    Gary
    May 4 at 12:54 am

    I made these and fried them in a grill pan for 6 minutes. Loved them! Thanks for the recipe.

  • Reply
    Lea
    June 9 at 1:24 pm

    Can they be stored when cooked or before?

    • Reply
      Sofia
      June 9 at 1:32 pm

      Hi Lea! They can be stored in the freezer after cooking :).

  • Reply
    Wes
    December 16 at 11:55 pm

    Just finished my first batch of these. They are outstanding. Also, after steaming I fried one in a pan. The crust that formed was delicious. I’ll be grilling some next. I wish I knew about these back when I gave up meat.

  • Reply
    Lars
    February 17 at 3:53 pm

    These are fenomenal. As an adaptation I tried smoking the tofu before mixing.! great texture Thank you so much for the recipe.

  • Reply
    Herman De La Cour
    December 12 at 2:53 pm

    I love that your recipe doesn’t have oil as an ingredient. I’ve made these twice now and they are fantastic. I’m in the middle of making another batch for a friend who has decided to stop eating animals. Thank you for sharing xx

  • Reply
    Steve
    March 16 at 3:01 pm

    This looks great, I was thinking about stuffing the sausage mixture into edible vegetarian sausage casings. Back when I ate meat, I would make my own Polish kielbasa for Easter. It was a fun tradition my twin brother and I did ever year. We stopped doing this 3 years ago when I became a vegetarian. Do you know if anyone has tried this yet? I also will need to triple this recipe. Would you recommend just tripling it or should I make three separate batches? I am worried about the kneading part if the recipe is too large. This recipe looks by far the best I have seen on the internet. I can’t wait to try this !

  • Reply
    Genevieve
    April 11 at 2:06 am

    What type of tofu do you use? Is it silken or firm?

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